All posts tagged: The Hoodoo Detective

creativity pathworking yesod to hod

Pathworking for Creativity

Last Thursday I presented a workshop on Magical Creativity for Joy Reichard‘s In Her Name Circle. During the workshop, we did a qaballistic pathworking (a fancy term for a guided meditation) taking an imaginary journey from the sphere of Yesod to Hod. The path is represented by the Tarot card, the Sun. For this journey, I like the Sun card from Robert Place’s Tarot of the Sevenfold Mystery, because of its male and female aspects. Share this on Facebook>>> And since no good presentation should go to waste, I’m posting the pathworking below: Follow your breath, letting go of the tension and stress of the week, the hustle of getting here on time. Let it go, and breathe in peace and light. Spiral all the pieces of yourself you’ve scattered out into the world back into your heart’s space so you are right here, right now. Imagine you are in a room filled with swirling purple-tinted mist and lit from below. This is the temple of Yesod, Foundation, the beginning of the etheric planes. The elemental forces binding matter …

hoodoo music

A Hoodoo Detective’s Playlist

Because what we really need more of are magical tunes, I’ve put together a Hoodoo Detective themed playist. These songs all have a spooky, New Orleans groove. [Tweet this!] So don’t wait for next Halloween – give them a listen!   Share this link on Facebook>>> 1. Even Witches Like to Go Out Dancing, by Graveyard Train. You’ll want to go out dancing too after listening to this song. 2. For Anyone, by Star Anna. Not feeling like yourself tonight? Watch out for that Devil Moon… 3. I Put a Spell on You, by Nina Simone. A timeless classic. 4. Ain’t No Grave, by Johnny Cash. And speaking of rawness, no one can rock an old hymn like cash. 5. Kill of the Night, by Gin Wigmore. 6. Skeletons, by the Eli Young Band. Eli Young can make just about anything cheerful. Breakup songs, skeletons in the closet. 7. Save My Soul, by Big Bad Voodoo Daddy. Swing mixes with electronica in this upbeat ode to New Orleans. About the Author Kirsten Weiss is the …

paranormal subtext

Wednesday Writing Challenge: Supernatural Subtext

There are different types of subtext, but in this exercise we’ll be looking at the words you choose to express the hidden (or true) meaning behind the scene. Subtext is implied, not stated, and it is implied through the details. Here’s the challenge: Write a one or two-paragraph Christmas scene – no dialog, just the scene. Fire blazing in the hearth, chestnuts popping, that sort of thing. But use subtext to show a subtle, underlying supernatural spookiness. Does the snow glitter like broken glass? Is an ornament lying in shards beneath the tree? Does the mother ghost into the room? The goal here is to create two levels of meaning – an ostensibly typical, cheery, Christmas scene but with something beneath. If you really want to delve into the many levels and uses of subtext, I recommend the brilliant little book, The Art of Subtext – Beyond Plot, by Charles Baxter. And if you’d like some examples of how Agatha Christie used supernatural subtext, check out this essay. And as always, feel free to post your …

Christmas witch

10 Luscious Etsy Shops to Delight Your Favorite Witch!

Looking for a Christmas/Yule present for that special witch in your life? Check out some of these fabulous witchy shops on Etsy! But don’t delay, shipping can be glacial this time of year… White Magick Alchemy: A massive supply of high-quality oils, misters, and candle magick, among other things. And they sell some gorgeous pendulums I’ve got my eye on. WitchBabySoap: Body products with a witchy flavor. My fav: The Psychic Body Butter. It feels and smells fantastic. Wytchen Wood: Based in the UK, the products have a Celtic/shamanistic bent, selling Ogham sets, wands, runes, and more. Raw, primal, gorgeous. Witchcrafts Artisan Alchemy: Monster selection of magical products – from oils to candles to pretty much everything in between. Wicked house Mercantile: Want, want, want their mysteriously labeled herb jars with the magickal properties of the herbs listed on the back. Also, a lovely selection of mini-cauldron,s an extensive collection of tea, and much, much more. White Witch Parlor: Incense and terrific oil samplers. The Shabby Witch: Magical kits, mojo bags, hoodoo kits, and an extensive collection …

Magical Mt. Shasta

Magical Mt. Shasta

The darkness is absolute. Steam and burning herbs scald my nostrils, choke my throat. I’m not actually claustrophobic, but panic sends my heart into a canter, and I remind myself the tent opening is only four feet to my left. I’m in a sweat lodge near Mt. Shasta. It’s the Day of the Dead, and for a moment, in that burning pitch, it seems I’ve descended to the underworld. A native American woman brushes the hot stones with dried grasses, and sparks glow, fly, vanish, plunging us in darkness again. Though I grew up in California, I’d never explored Shasta. I arrived the day before Halloween battling my first real case of writer’s block and with the intention to sit in a remote cabin in the woods until the words came. I also figured it would be an opportunity to channel my inner Agent Mulder and explore the mountain’s paranormal mysteries. Halloween at Mt. Shasta was both a good and bad idea. Good because Shasta is one of the few places in California you can …

anaphora

Wednesday Writing Challenge: Anaphora

Anaphora is a prose technique of repetition, and it packs a punch. (Yeah, I’ve got a weakness for alliteration too). Anyway, anaphora means repeating the same word or phrase at the beginning of three or more sentences or phrases in a row. Its opposite is epistrophe – the repetition of a word or phrase at the end of successive phrases or sentences. Here’s an example from the first chapter of The Hoodoo Detective, which I ended up not using in the book (because sometimes you have to kill your proverbial darlings): But all Riga felt was irritation. Irritation that so far the Haunted New Orleans episode of Supernatural Encounters had been a bust. Irritation that she’d felt obliged to do the reality show. Irritation that she didn’t really need the money from the series, her husband had plenty for them both. And that left her awkwardly trying to demonstrate some relevance, keeping her hand in as an income earner. And why did she feel the need to prove herself in their marriage? At the thought of her husband, her annoyance …

sugar skull

5 Curious Facts About Sugar Skulls and the Day of the Dead

Living in California, I was never exactly oblivious to Dia de los Muertos celebrations. But am I imagining it, or are sugar skulls becoming… well… bigger? Within the past few years, I’ve noticed more and more images of women (and some men) with faces painted like skulls. So I thought I’d do some research. What do these strangely seductive skulls mean? 1) November 1st is the Dia de Los Muertos: It’s believed that the gates of heaven open at midnight on October 31st, and the spirits of departed children are allowed to return to their families on November 1st. On November 2nd, adult spirits can share in the festivities. 2) A 3,500 Year Old Tradition: The Aztecs had a month-long celebration honoring those who’d died, welcoming the spirits back to the earth for a visit. Skulls were often displayed as a part of the festivities. Today’s Day of the Dead represents a mixture of Catholic and indigenous beliefs, and skulls are a colorful part of Day of the Dead symbolism. 3) Sugar skulls are made of… you guessed it: sugar. Italian …